Microbiome pilot study with Lactobacillus Reuteri 6475

This pilot study originally done and data collected in 2015.  A new method to analyze results became available in 2019.

It’s actually a microbiome experiment to find out whether some earlier work in animals and humans would translate to humans (the two of us in this pilot/small study).

It’s another example of the importance of the microbiome in health and longevity.

Let’s talk if you plan to recreate this, or do something like it.  There can be positive and negative effects, and different people may react in different ways.

BACKGROUND

Studies had shown that the gut microbe Lactobacillus Reuteri 6475 upregulated oxytocin (OT) production, and probably had some other unknown activity, resulting in positive effects.

Biologicals of this type were difficult to get, but since we have a 501(c)(3) nonprofit foundation I was able to complete a rigid qualification process to purchase.

For our small/pilot study, Bill cultured the 6475 and we both ate a cup 2x daily.  It tasted OK.

In 2015 our biomarker and objective measure testing was not nearly as developed as now.

We had some lab biomarkers before and after, including complete blood count/metabolic panel (CBC) and C-Reactive Protein (CRP), and grip strength.

Tests to directly measure OT would have been particularly useful.  We later learned about a new test for OT from Meridian Labs.

We achieved at least some positive objectively measured results (one was outstanding), and some positive subjective effects that some might say indicated better clearance of brain waste components while sleeping, and some negative.

Some positive effects of oxytocin and L reuteri reported in literature, mostly in animals but some humans:

  • Improved aged muscle stem cell functionOxytocin (OT) injected subcutaneously improved aged muscle stem cell function
  • Oxytocin – Attenuates atherosclerosis and inflammation
  • Oxytocin – Wound healing in Humans
  • L reuteri – Reduced intestinal inflammation
  • Lactobacillus reuteri 6475 Oxytocin – Wound healing is twice as fast
  • Lactobacillus reuteri 6475 – Decreases gut inflammation Reverses or prevents bone loss, osteoporosis
  • Lactobacillus reuteri 6475 – Maintains young testosterone levels & testicular size

After we consulted with age management physicians and could not uncover any objective changes in the lab work.  Some changes were noted that were probably random and certainly not statistically significant.  One with training in neurology and neuroendocrine said although no harm was done, it might be similar to a drug.

But years later and through the outstanding work of Morgan Levine to correlate standard CBC/metabolic panel and CRP data with computed DNA methylation age, AND the work of our member John Cramer to create a spreadsheet so we can use Levine’s method –

I plugged the CBC and CRP data into the “LevineCramer” spreadsheet to calculate phenotypic age.

After the treatment my phenotypic age had decreased from 63.25 to 58.65 – 4.6 years.

And subjectively something was definitely going on.

At the beginning we both had robust, active dreams through much of the night.  There was a kind of similar negative recurring theme to mine.  Appeared oxytocin or something else was getting into the brain.

For a while more thirsty – especially at night.  Less later.

Pretty sure more athletic stamina when walking (even after working hard all day)

Maybe more energy – maybe not.

Definitely higher libido

Felt revved up — Songs going through my head

When meditating seemed less able to get into a meditative state

But I was working very hard, and living in an old motorhome and was kind of roughing it.

After discontinuing I became kind of sad for a couple days.  I do NOT ever get sad or depressed in that way.

Bill’s notes are no longer available.

There’s a company called BioGaia that offered a product called “Gastrus”  It contained L reuteri 6475 and 17938.

https://www.iherb.com/pr/BioGaia-Gastrus-For-GI-Tract-Mandarin-Flavored-30-Chewable-Tablets/80974

It wasn’t sold in the US at the time but I used some resourcefulness to get it out of South Korea where it was being tested.

The “formal” part of the small study had ended and I switched from the yogurt to the Biogaia Gastrus.  Living conditions were changing and here it gets a little murky.

—–

WHETHER TO CONTINUE OR NOT

After the end of the 1 month small study I needed to return from the San Francisco Bay Area to Orange County.  The Gastrus didn’t seem to have any effects so decided other action items were more important that culturing it on my own so based on the resulting information from limited objective measures at the time I decided not to continue.

—–

RECENT TEST WE DID WITH 3 GRG MEMBERS

Maybe they would like to comment.

Recently in addition to “Gastrus” (contained 6475 and 17938) BioGaia started selling Osfortis with only 6475.

https://www.biogaia.com/product/biogaia-osfortis/

Three members took the recommended dose 1 tablet 2x daily of Osfortis for a month, and had CBC and CRP tests before and just before ending.

They did report any negative side effects so carried it out to the full 1 month.

They did not show a significant positive effects or reduction in phenotypic age.  One’s LevineCramer markers went in the right direction, and others went in the undesirable direction, with result that was actually about 2-1/2 yr older.

Johnny

About Johnny Adams

My full-time commitment is to slow and ultimately reverse biological aging and age related decline for more years of healthy living. I’ve been active in this area since the 1970s, steadily building skills and accomplishments. I have a good basic understanding of the science of aging, and have many skills that complement those of scientists so they can focus on science to advance our shared mission. Broad experience Top skills: administration, management, information technology (data and programming), communications, writing, marketing, market research and analysis, public speaking, forging ethical win-win outcomes among stakeholders (i.e. high level "selling"). Knowledge in grant writing, fundraising, finance. Like most skilled professionals, I’m best described as a guy who defines an end point, then figures out how to get there. I enjoy the conception, design, execution and successful completion of a grand plan. Executive Director Gerontology Research Group (GRG). Manages Email discussion forum, web site, meetings and oversees supercentenarian (oldest humans, 110+ years) research. CEO / Executive Director Aging Intervention Foundation (dba for Carl I. Bourhenne Medical Research Foundation), an IRS approved 501(c)(3) nonprofit. http://www.AgingIntervention.org Early contributor to Supercentenarian Research Foundation. Co-Founder Geroscience Healthspan Forum. Active contributor to numerous initiatives to increase healthy years of life. Co-authored book on conventional, practical methods available today to slow the processes of aging – nutrition, exercise, behavior modification and motivation, stress reduction, proper supplementation, damage caused by improper programs, risk reduction and others. Fundamental understanding of, and experience in the genomics of longevity (internship analyzing and curating longevity gene papers). Biological and technical includes information technology, software development and computer programming, bioinformatics and protein informatics, online education, training programs, regulatory, clinical trials software, medical devices (CAT scanners and related), hospital electrical equipment testing program. Interpersonal skills – good communication, honest, well liked, works well in teams or alone. Real world experience collaborating in interdisciplinary teams in fast paced organizations. Uses technology to advance our shared mission. Education: MBA 1985 University of Southern California -- Deans List, Albert Quon Community Service Award (for volunteering with the American Longevity Association and helping an elderly lady every other week), George S. May Scholarship, CA State Fellowship. BA psychology, psychobiology emphasis 1983 California State University Fullerton Physiological courses as well as core courses (developmental, abnormal etc). UCLA Psychobiology 1978, one brief but fast moving and fulfilling quarter. Main interest was the electrochemical basis of consciousness. Also seminars at the NeuroPsychiatric Institute. Other: Ongoing conferences, meetings and continuing education. Aging, computer software and information technology. Some molecular biology, biotech, bio and protein informatics, computer aided drug design, clinical medical devices, electronics, HIPAA, fundraising through the Assoc. of Fundraising Professionals. Previous careers include: Marketing Increasing skill set and successes in virtually all phases, with valuable experience in locating people and companies with the greatest need and interest in a product or service, and sitting across the table with decision makers and working out agreements favorable to all. Information Technology: Management, data analysis and programming in commercial and clinical trials systems, and bioinformatics and protein informatics. As IT Director at Newport Beach, CA based technology organization Success Family of Continuing Education Companies, provided online software solutions for insurance and financial professionals in small to Fortune 500 size companies. We were successful with lean team organization (the slower moving competition was unable to create similar software systems). Medical devices: At Omnimedical in Paramount CA developed and managed quality assurance dept. and training depts. for engineers, physicians and technicians. Designed hospital equipment testing program for hospital services division. In my early 20’s I was a musician, and studied psychology and music. Interned with the intention of becoming a music therapist. These experiences helped develop valuable skills used today to advance our shared mission of creating aging solutions.
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